Twitter Shares Drop But Twitter Chief Still Confident

twitter engagement

Twitter is a social media platform that we’ve taken to our hearts.

Millions of users generate an army of tweets promoting, connecting and chatting creating an online community that’s far reaching.

Despite that, Twitter is finding it tough to turn a profit.

A recent article in The Drum announced that Twitter’s latest published results have shown the company losing £175m between July and September despite a surge in sales and users.

Promising figures showing sales up 114% to $361m and a 23% rise in monthly active users to 284m failed to mollify investors with shares dropping 8% in after-hours trading due to the figures falling substantially behind analyst forecasts of around $450m in sales.

Despite that gloomy reading, Twitter chief, Dick Costolo was reported to have described it as a:

…very strong financial quarter. I’m confident in our ability to build the largest daily audience in the world.”

Mind you, it is still lagging behind Facebook – so is this the beginning of the end, or can Twitter turn things around?

 

Sally Ormond – Briar Copywriting Ltd

 

 

 

Infographic – Increase Your YouTube Engagement

YouTube is a formidable marketing force.

Your customers will love your videos and so with the search engines.

Did you know YouTube is the top video website and second largest search engine in the world?

To help you get more out of your YouTube marketing, here’s an infographic created by QuickSprout and published by Socialmouths:

YouTube engagement

 

How to Create Powerful Press Release [Infographic]

Press releases are the staple of your marketing strategy, but they are often done badly. This infographic outlines how to write the perfect press release that will get you noticed.

How to write a press release

 

 

 

ISBA’s Reaction to Google’s Online Piracy Crackdown

According to a recent article in The Drum Google is stepping up its efforts to cut out online piracy.

It has made changes to its algorithm to make sure some of the most notorious piracy sites are less likely to appear high in the results when someone searches for music, films or other copyrighted content. The idea is that Google will make sure legal sites appear at top of the pile albeit in the form of adverts – yes, that’s right, content providers will have to pay to appear there.

It is that last bit that’s got the ISBA riled.

The ISBA’s director of media and advertising, Bob Wootton commented:

“This is a step in the right direction, but with Google seeking to profit directly by ‘being part of the solution’ spoils the sentiment and leaves a bitter after-taste.

“The search engine’s solution clearly disadvantages legal sites. The fight against online piracy is of course welcomed by ISBA, but trying to make a profit out of it is surely not the way to go.”

You can read Google’s full about the measures taken here.

Is this a good thing?

You can’t deny that Google’s moving in  the right direction, but is their solution really the best?

Certainly for their bottom line it is, but what about the consumer?

Will this levy have a knock on effect to the end consumer, effectively driving more people to the piracy sites therefore compounding the problem?

What are your thoughts on this issue? Leave a comment below to have your say.

 

 

 

The Importance of Being Human in Your Marketing

There’s no room for personality in business.

Really?

Are you sure about that?

If you are the type of business owner that believes all your marketing communications should be straight, professional and (for want of a better word) boring, it’s time to be enlightened.

Have a think about the marketing messages that resonate with you.

What was it that made you sit up and take notice.

I would hazard a guess at the way it ‘spoke’ to you. After all, if the message is boring and mundane it’s going to get lost amongst the many thousands of other marketing messages out there. If it’s to get noticed it must have personality.

Let’s face it, when you go into a store, if you’re met by disinterested store assistants who look bored to be there, you’re more than likely going to walk straight out the door again.

Likewise, if you land on a website in your search for that new wonder gadget you’re after and are faced with reams of boring text that tells you nothing other than it’s colour, power outage and that it’s “ground breaking” without any qualification to back that statement up, you’ll hit the back browser and look elsewhere.

That’s why your marketing, no matter what shape or form it takes, must have personality.

Brand POW or brand pop?

Every piece of marketing you put out must reflect the brand image you’ve worked so hard to build.

You do have a brand image, right?

The idea behind this consistent message is that your customers will get to recognise you from your style, colours, words and images.

OK, sure, small companies are unlikely to get the instant recognition enjoyed by the big players such as Apple, IBM, Nike or John Lewis, but a consistent message will help people identify you with the values you hold dear.

Building your personality

If you are a sole trader or an individual service provider, you shouldn’t need to work too hard on building your personality – it’s already there.

All you have to do is write your marketing materials from the heart.

When customers read your stuff, it should be consistent with the person they meet. If there’s a huge disconnect, they are less likely to do business with you.

Why?

Because from the moment they read your brochure or website, they began to form a relationship with you. They have, in their mind, an impression of who you are and what you’ll be like to work with. If, when they meet you, the real you is completely different that relationship will break down.

How do you get your personality across?

Write as though you were having a conversation with your customer. Picture yourself in your favourite pub, relaxing over a glass of wine (beer etc.) chatting about how you can help them. In real life, you’ll use simple language, no jargon and you’ll explain things in a way that makes them instantly accessible. This type of approach will make your customers warm to you and be more likely to talk to you to ask your advice because you won’t be going in for the hard sell.

It takes a bit of practice and goes against all the rules of academic writing that were drilled into you at school, but it will pay off if you persevere at it.

If you run a larger company my advice is the same.

The personality that comes through is that of your business, which means clearly identifying the values you want to reflect. Again, a simple, jargon-free conversational tone will work best in your marketing copy creating an impression of warmth and openness.

To create your personality:

  • Think about the values that are important to you
  • Write in a simple, jargon-free conversational tone
  • Think about how you want your customers to see you

 

Author – Sally Ormond, Briar Copywriting Ltd

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