How to Write a Blockbusting Video Script

Video script


The internet is jam packed with videos these days.

Bloggers, would-be musicians and companies are all at it vying for your attention.

That means if your video is going to cut the mustard and get noticed it’s got to be something pretty special.

Granted, the production, initial idea and storyboard will have a lot to do with that, but so too will your video’s script. After all, you need powerful words to make the most of the action.

Making an impact

The first thing to remember is that your script must be written in spoken English.

Written English, as you would use for web copy and other marketing materials, will come across as stilted, so it’s important to write as you speak.

Whether you have a storyboard to fit your script to, or you’re writing freestyle, it’s important to start with the most important person – the customer.

Every word must be directed at them and what they need, so think about:

  • What are they looking for?
  • How does the product/service help them?
  • How will it make their life better?

These should all be addressed early on (and recapped at the end) before you talk about any features.

Pain and pleasure

Once you’ve worked out what you need to cover to answer the question above, finding the customer’s pain (i.e. the problem they have and the reason for them looking for a solution) should be fairly easy.

Your next stop is to highlight this issue in your script and show how the product/service will alleviate it and make their life better.


Going back to the earlier point of using spoken English – now’s the time to ignore (some) grammatical rules and write as you speak.

Don’t get me wrong, it still has to be good English, just not as straight-laced as written English.

The best way to make sure you’ve captured it is to read the script out loud and adjust it until it sounds like natural speech.

The length of the script

Remember this is a video, not a feature length film.

The video isn’t there to answer every question the customer has; it’s there to tempt them into finding out more.

Ideally, your video shouldn’t exceed 90 seconds.

Call to action

Yes, your script does need a call to action.

If you don’t include one, it will just fizzle.

Recap your main points (especially the benefits) and tell them how to get in touch. The final visual should be of the web address, phone number and email. Let’s face it if you forget that they’re not going to get in touch.

So, a quick recap:

  • Write for the customer
  • Write in spoken English
  • Keep to 90 seconds or less
  • Finish with a call to action


Author – Sally Ormond, Briar Copywriting Ltd

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